I want to encourage you to leave comments. We are amateurs and I'm sure we make mistakes in the identity of some of the flowers. We are photographers first and botanist second. I do hope you enjoy the photography. Click on any picture to make it larger.

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Common cinquefoil (Potentilla simplex)

Photographic Location: AEDC in Middle Tennessee.
Rose Family (Rosaceae)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Sunday, May 1, 2016

Quaker Ladies (Houstonia caerulea)

Photographic Location: AEDC in Middle Tennessee.
Madder Family (Rubiaceae)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Saturday, April 30, 2016

Nashville Breadroot (Pediomelum subacaule)

Photographic Location: Cedar Forrest in Middle Tennessee.

Photographic Location: Cedar Forrest in Middle Tennessee. White is very rare.
Pea Family (Fabaceae)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Friday, April 29, 2016

Slender Blue Flag (Iris prismatica)

Photographic Location: AEDC in Middle Tennessee.

Iris Family (Iridaceae)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Mountain (Piedmont) Azalea (Rhododendron canescens)

Photographic Location: AEDC in Middle Tennessee.

Heath Family (Ericaceae)

Photographic Location: AEDC in Middle Tennessee.
For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Primrose Leaf Violet (Viola primulifolia L.)

Photographic Location: AEDC in Middle Tennessee.
Violet family (Violaceae)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Navel Corn Salad (Valerianella umbilicata)

Photographic Location: Wilson County in Middle Tennessee 
Photographic Location: Wilson County in Middle Tennessee


Valerian family (Valerianaceae)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Monday, April 25, 2016

Dame's Rocket (Hesperis matronalis L.)

Photographic Location: Wilson County in Middle Tennessee

Mustard family (Brassicaceae)

This plant is not native and is invasive.

For more information about this plant, Click Here.
 

Sunday, April 24, 2016

Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.)

Photographic Location: Standing Stone State Park in Middle Tennessee
Buttercup family (Ranunculaceae)

 For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Southern Stoneseed (Lithospermum tuberosum)

Photographic Location: Standing Stone State Park in Middle Tennessee
Borage family (Boraginaceae)

For more information about this plant, Click Here

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Dwarf Larkspur (Delphinium tricorne)

Photographic Location: Standing Stone State Park in Middle TN.
Buttercup family (Ranunculaceae)

For more information about this plant, Click Here

Photographic Location: Standing Stone State Park in Middle TN.
 

Monday, April 18, 2016

Yellow Mandarin, Fairy Bells (Prosartes lanuginosum)

Photographic Location: Standing Stone State Park in Middle TN.
Family Name: Liliaceae

For More information about this plant, Click Here and  Click Here.

For images of another member of this family which is also blooming now, Spotted Mandarin (Prosartes maculatum), Click Here.

Saturday, April 2, 2016

Baby Blue Eyes (Nemophila aphylla)

Photographic Location: Private Land Near Fontanel in Middle TN.
This plant is in the Waterleaf Family: Hydrophyllaceae.

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Friday, April 1, 2016

Sharp-Lobed Hepaticia (Hepatica nobilis)


Photographic Location: Burgess Falls State Park in Middle TN
The little white flower in the picture is Rue Anemone (Thalictrum thalictroides) a very close relative to Hepaticia. Notice the leaves in the bottom right. The leaves of the Hepaticia are right below the Rue Anemone. Below is a better picture of the Hepaticia.

Photographic Location: Burgess Falls State Park in Middle TN
This plant is a member of the Ranunculaceae: Buttercup Family.

For more information and pictures, Click Here and Click Here.
 

Thursday, March 31, 2016

Smooth Rock Cress (Arabis laevigata)

Photographic Location: Burgess Falls State Part in Middle Tennessee
This plant is a member of the Brassicaceae: Mustard family.

For more information about this wildflower, Click Here and Click Here.

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Hedgehog Wood Rush (Luzula echinata)

Photographic Location: Burgess Falls State Park in middle TN
 In spite of its grassy or sedge-like appearance, the native Hedgehog Wood Rush (Luzula echinata) is a member of the Rush family (Juncaceae) as its seeds and scaly tepals are typical of species in this family. Hedgehog Wood Rush has been classified as a variety of the European Luzula campestris (Field Wood Rush), or Luzula campestris echinata. It has also been classified as a subspecies or variety of the native Luzula multiflora (Common Wood Rush), or Luzula multiflora echinata. At the present time, most taxonomists consider Hedgehog Wood Rush to be a distinct species.
Photographic Location: Burgess Falls State Park in middle TN
For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Camping trip to David Crockett State Park

   Judy and I just got back from a three day camping trip to David Crockett State Park.
   David Crockett was a pioneer, soldier, politician and industrialist. He was born near the little town of Limestone in northeast Tennessee in 1786. In 1817, he moved to Lawrence County and served as a justice of the peace, a colonel of the militia and as a state representative. Along the banks of Shoal Creek, in what is now his namesake park, he established a diversified industry consisting of a powder mill, a gristmill and a distillery. All three operations were washed away in a flood in September 1821. Financial difficulties from this loss caused Crockett to move to West Tennessee where he was elected to Congress. While in Washington, he fought for his people’s right to keep land they had settled on in the new frontier of West Tennessee. Crockett died at the Alamo Mission in March of 1836 while aiding the Texans in their fight for independence from Mexico.
   During the summer months, swimming is a popular park activity. An Olympic-sized swimming pool with a modern bathhouse and vending machines is a great way to beat the heat. 
   The park has an onsite restaurant that overlooks 40-acre scenic Lindsey Lake. The restaurant features home-style cooking from the buffet or menu.
  In addition to the paved bike trail, the park has more than six miles of hiking trails. The trails offer scenic vistas of Shoal Creek and Crockett Falls, limestone bluffs, abundant wildlife and serene forest. The Overlook Trail runs parallel to the Shoal Creek Trail.

Photographic Location: David Crockett State Park - Pennywort (Obolaria virginica L)

David Crockett State Park has seven cabins near beautiful Lindsey Lake. Each cabin is completely furnished with two bedrooms, two baths, a full kitchen and covered patio. These unique modern accommodations were designed and built with energy efficiency in mind. They are designated Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified vacation homes.

Photographic Location: David Crockett State Park

Photographic Location: Stillhouse Hollow Falls State Natural Area - Sweet Betsy (Trilium Cuneatum)

   The 1,100-acre park has a museum, staffed during the summer months, with exhibits depicting Crockett’s life here and a water-powered grist mill. 

Photographic Location: David Crockett State Park

Photographic Location: David Crockett State Park

Photographic Location: David Crockett State Park

Photographic Location: David Crockett State Park - Early Saxifrage (Saxifraga virginiensis Michaux)

Photographic Location: David Crockett State Park

Photographic Location: David Crockett State Park

Photographic Location: David Crockett State Park

Stillhouse Hollow Falls is a 90-acre state natural area located approximately 21 miles southwest of Columbia and three miles northeast of Summertown off Hwy US 43 in Maury County. The natural area is on the Western Highland Rim in the Duck River watershed. The geology of this region creates scenic natural features such as seeps, flat shale-bottom streams, and waterfalls, both small and large, which help shape the region’s dissected topography.
The natural area is named for its most significant feature, Stillhouse Hollow Falls, which can be seen by walking approximately 2/3 of a mile along the Stillhouse Hollow Falls trail. The trail crosses an unnamed tributary that forms small scenic cascades before plunging approximately 75 feet over the falls. A deep hollow is formed below the falls that is surrounded by steep slopes where wet-weather springs emerge contributing to a rich habitat supporting a colorful spring wildflower display of trillium, spiderwort, wild geranium, phlox and many other species.
- See more at: https://www.tn.gov/environment/article/na-na-stillhouse-hollow-falls#sthash.eN6NZWvX.dpuf

   Stillhouse Hollow Falls is a 90-acre state natural area located approximately 21 miles southwest of Columbia and three miles northeast of Summertown off Hwy US 43 in Maury County. The natural area is on the Western Highland Rim in the Duck River watershed. The geology of this region creates scenic natural features such as seeps, flat shale-bottom streams, and waterfalls, both small and large, which help shape the region’s dissected topography.
   The natural area is named for its most significant feature, Stillhouse Hollow Falls, which can be seen by walking approximately 2/3 of a mile along the Stillhouse Hollow Falls trail. The trail crosses an unnamed tributary that forms small scenic cascades before plunging approximately 75 feet over the falls. A deep hollow is formed below the falls that is surrounded by steep slopes where wet-weather springs emerge contributing to a rich habitat supporting a colorful spring wildflower display of trillium, spiderwort, wild geranium, phlox and many other species.
See more about Stillhouse Hollow Falls by Clicking Here.

Photographic Location: Stillhouse Hollow Falls State Natural Area

Photographic Location: Stillhouse Hollow Falls State Natural Area - Blood Root (Sanguinaria canadenis)

Photographic Location: Stillhouse Hollow Falls State Natural Area - Yellow Trout Lily (Erythronium americanum)

Photographic Location: Stillhouse Hollow Falls State Natural Area
Photographic Location: Stillhouse Hollow Falls State Natural Area - Jacobs Ladder (Polemonium reptans)

Sunday, March 20, 2016

Harbinger-of-Spring (Erigenia bulbosa)


Photographic Location: Taylor Hollow State Natural Area

This plant is in the carrot family (Apiaceae). 

To see more about this flower on this previous post. (Click Here)

To learn more about Taylor Hollow, (Click Here) 



Saturday, March 19, 2016

Rue Anemone (Thalictrum thalictroides)

Photographic Location: Standing Stone State Park in Middle TN

This flower is a member of the Buttercup family (Ranunculaceae)

 Comments: Rue Anemone is one of many showy wildflowers that develop in deciduous woodlands during the spring. Both the flowers and foliage are quite attractive. Because the flowers move around easily in the wind, it is sometimes called 'Windflower.' Another scientific name of this species is Anemonella thalictroides. Rue Anemone resembles Enemion biternatum (False Rue Anemone), but its flowers have more petaloid sepals (typically 6-9), while the flowers of False Rue Anemone have only 5 petaloid sepals. Furthermore, its leaves and flowers are arranged in whorls to a greater extent than those of False Rue Anemone.


For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Photographic Location: Taylor Hollow State Natural Area in Middle TN
 


Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Celandine Poppy (Stylophorum diphyllum)


Poppy family (Papaveraceae)

    Description: This native perennial plant is 1–1½' tall, consisting of basal leaves and a stem that terminates in a small cluster of flowers. This stem is conspicuously hairy and has a pair of opposite leaves. The leaves are up to 6" long and 2½" across. They are double pinnatifid; there are 2-3 pairs of primary lobes along the length of each leaf, while shallow secondary lobes occur along the length of each primary lobe. There are scattered short hairs across the upper surface of each leaf, although they are hard to see.

        The petioles of the leaves are rather long and conspicuously hairy. There is little difference in the appearance of the basal and cauline leaves, although the latter tend to have shorter petioles. The foliage contains a yellow sap. The upper stem terminates in a single flower or a floppy umbel of 2-4 flowers. Each flower is 1-2" across, consisting of 4 bright yellow petals, 2 deciduous sepals, numerous stamens with yellow anthers, and a single pistil with a knobby stigma. The blooming period occurs from mid- to late spring and lasts about 2-3 weeks. After the petals fall off, the pistil matures into an ovoid seed capsule about 1" long. This seed capsule is densely hairy and divides into 4 segments. Numerous seeds are released after the seed capsule splits apart. The root system produces rhizomes, which enables this plant to form vegetative colonies.
   
    Cultivation: The Celandine Poppy should be grown in dappled sunlight underneath a tree, or along the foundation of a building in partial shade. It adapts best to rich loamy soil and moist to mesic conditions. Vegetative growth occurs during the spring before the trees fully leaf out.

    Range & Habitat: The Celandine Poppy is mainly a plant of the northeastern US, extending south into TN, where is is found from the Highland Rim eastward. Habitats include mesic deciduous woodlands, including the bottom of ravines and the base of bluffs. This species is found in high quality woodlands; it is one of the woodland wildflowers that is threatened by the invasion of Alliaria petiolata (Garlic Mustard).

    Faunal Associations: Little is known about floral-fauna relations for this species. The flowers are probably pollinated by bees and possibly other insects. The seeds are distributed by ants, which are attracted to their fleshy appendages (elaisomes). The foliage is toxic and avoided by mammalian herbivores.

    Photographic Location: A designated state natural area in Middle TN.

    Comments: This attractive spring-blooming wildflower adapts well to gardens. It resembles another member of the Poppy family, Chelidonium majus (Celandine), but the latter has yellow flowers that are smaller (¾" across or less) and its seed capsules are hairless, linear and erect. Celandine is a somewhat weedy species that was introduced from Europe; it is a biennial that blooms during the summer. Other members of the Poppy family have flowers that are white, pink, orange, or purplish red. Another common name that is often applied to Stylophorum diphyllum is the Wood Poppy. This plant is considered poisonous.