I want to encourage you to leave comments. We are amateurs and I'm sure we make mistakes in the identity of some of the flowers. We are photographers first and botanist second. I do hope you enjoy the photography. Click on any picture to make it larger.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis)

Photographic Location: Taylor Hollow State Natural Area in Middle Tennessee.

Papaveraceae (Poppy Family)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Photographic Location: Taylor Hollow State Natural Area in Middle Tennessee.


Photographic Location: Taylor Hollow State Natural Area in Middle Tennessee.


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Yellow Trout Lily (Erythronium americanum)

Photographic Location: Taylor Hollow State Natural Area in Middle Tennessee.
Liliaceae (Lily Family)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.


Photographic Location: Edgar Evans State Park in Middle Tennessee.


Photographic Location: Taylor Hollow State Natural Area in Middle Tennessee.


Monday, March 20, 2017

Ozark Trillium (Trillium pusillum var. ozarkanum)

Photographic Location: Taylor Hollow State Natural Area in Middle Tennessee.

Liliaceae (Lily Family)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.


Photographic Location: Taylor Hollow State Natural Area in Middle Tennessee.


Photographic Location: Taylor Hollow State Natural Area in Middle Tennessee.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Rose Vervain (Glandularia canadensis)

Photographic Location: Edgar Evans State Park in Middle Tennessee

Verbenaceae (Vervain Family)


For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Nathan Bedford Forrest Winter Wildflowers


First 2017 camping trip to Nathan Bedford Forest State Park

Spring Beauty (Claytonia virginica)
The view Forrest and his troops would have had of the Tennessee River.
Star Chickweed (Stellaria pubera)
Monument to Nathan Bedford Forrest
Last year's Striped Wintergreen (Chimaphila maculata L) with seed pod.
At the Nathan Bedford Forrest Museum.
Rue Anemone (Anemonella thalictroides)
Nathan Bedford Forrest Museum
Slender Toothwort (Dentaria heterophylla)
Fishing boat used on the Tennessee River inside the Nathan Bedford Forrest Museum

Butterweed (Packera glabella)
Nathan Bedford Forrest Museum
Cut-Leaf Toothwort (Dentaria laciniata)
Nathan Bedford Forrest Museum
Early Buttercup (Ranunculus fascicularis)
Original Confederate Medal of honor at the Nathan Bedford Forrest Museum
Confederate Violet (Viola papilionacea)
Part of the Nathan Bedford Forrest Museum
Confederate Violet (Viola papilionacea). Same violet, different color.
Camping at the Nathan Bedford Forrest State Park in EVA, TN
Kidney-Leaf Buttercup (Ranucculus abortivus)
Here is a view of the campground. We were the only ones there. Perfect!!!
On a final note; the question whether bears s..t in the woods has been answered. Here is one of their toilets!

Monday, February 20, 2017

Who cares what the ground hog says, there are definitely signs of spring in the woods. Yesterday I went to one of my favorite wildflower haunts, one of the several sites in Tennessee owned by the The Nature Conservancy. Here are a few of the flowers blooming now in middle Tennessee.

Aptly named, this is one of the very first wildflowers to bloom.
Harbinger-of-Spring (Eriginia bulbosa)

Here is another of the early bloomers. This flower is sometimes confused with False Rue Anemone which only has 5 petals.
Rue Anemone (Thalictrum thalictroides

Last but not least. This is one of the eight members of the Bitter-Cress family that blooms in Tennessee.
Purple Cress (Cardamine douglassii) 
Please share this blog with your friends and family that also might have a interest in the wildflowers of Tennessee.

Twitter: @wallacegeo48
Facebook Group: Whats Blooming Now

Monday, October 24, 2016

Aromatic Aster, Fall Aster, Wild Blue Aster (Symphyotrichum oblongifolium)

Photographic Location: Wilson County in Middle Tennessee.

Asteraceae (Aster Family)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Sunday, October 9, 2016

Giant Ironweed, Tall Ironweed (Vernonia gigantea)

Photographic Location: Sycamore Ridge Ranch in Middle Tennessee.
Asteraceae (Aster Family)

Photographic Location: Sycamore Ridge Ranch in Middle Tennessee.
For more information about this plant, Click Here.

 

Sunday, October 2, 2016

Yellow Crownbeard (Verbesina occidentalis)

Photographic Location: Sycamore Ridge Ranch in Middle Tennessee.

Asteraceae (Aster Family)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Maryland Golden Aster (Chrysopsis mariana)

Photographic Location: Fall Creek Falls State Park in Middle Tennessee.

Asteraceae (Aster Family)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Friday, September 23, 2016

Erect Goldenrod, Showy Goldenrod (Solidago erecta Pursh)

Photographic Location: Fall Creek Falls State Park in Middle Tennessee.
Asteraceae (Aster Family)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Downy Lobelia (Lobelia puberula)

Photographic Location: Fall Creek Falls State Park in Middle Tennessee.

Campanulaceae (Bellflower Family)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Narrow Leaf Sunflower (Helianthus angustifolius)

Photographic Location: Fall Creek Falls State Park in Middle TN
Asteraceae (Aster Family)

For more information about this plant, Click Here.

Friday, September 9, 2016

Woodland Sunflower (Helianthus divaricatus)


This wildflower is a member of the Aster family (Asteraceae).


For more information about this wildflower, Click Here.

Starry Campion, Widow's Frill (Silene stellata (L.) Ait. f.)


Caryophyllaceae (Pink Family)
 
Synonyms: Silene stellata var. scabrella

USDA Native Status: Native to U.S.

Photographic Location: Cumberland Mountain State Park, TN

An erect, loosely branching, perennial with lance-shaped leaves in whorls of four and terminal clusters of white, tubular flowers with flaring, deeply fringed petals. The sticky-stemmed plants average 2-3 ft. high. Deeply fringed, 5-petaled white flowers clustered atop tall slender stalks, with leaves mostly in whorls of 4.

This delicate wildflower is pollinated by butterflies and many kinds of moths. It is often grown in wildflower gardens.

Purple Fringeless Orchid (Platanthera peramoena)


Orchid family (Orchidaceae)

   Description: This native perennial orchid is 1-3' tall and unbranched. The central stem is light green and glabrous. Along this stem, there are 2-5 alternate leaves up to 8" long and 2" across; these leaves become smaller in size as they ascend the stem and they are held more or less upright. The leaf blades are light to medium green, lanceolate-oblong to narrowly ovate, and smooth along their margins; their veins are parallel. The central stem terminates in an elongated raceme of flowers about 3-8" long and 2½" across. The flowers are arranged somewhat densely all around the central stalk of the raceme, blooming from the bottom to the top. The flowers are usually bright rose-purple and less often pale rose-purple. Each flower is about 1" long and ¾" across, consisting of 3 petal-like sepals, 3 petals, the reproductive organs, and a nectar spur in the back (about 1" long) that nods downward. The upper sepal and two upper petals (about ¼" long) form a small hood (upper lip) above the reproductive organs. The lowest petal forms the lower lip of the flower (about ¾" long); it is deeply divided into 3 fan-shaped lobes that are barely fringed along their lower margins. The central lobe of the lower lip is larger than the lateral lobes; it usually has a small narrow notch in the middle of its lower margin. The lower sepals are about 1/3" long and form the sides of the flower; they extend further back than either the hood or the lower lip. Each flower has a stout ascending pedicel about 1" long. At the base of each pedicel, there is an ascending small bract (about ¾" long) that resembles a narrow leaf. The blooming period occurs during mid- to late summer and lasts about 3 weeks. Fertile flowers are replaced by erect seed capsules about ½–¾" long that are ellipsoid in shape. The capsules split open to release numerous tiny seeds that are dispersed by the wind. The root system consists of fleshy fibrous roots.

    Cultivation: The preference is full sun to light shade, moist conditions, and a slightly acidic soil that contains loam, silt, or gravel. Because the root system forms a symbiotic relationship with underground fungi, individual plants are difficult to transplant. During some years, this orchid may fail to flower.
    
    Range & Habitat: Purple Fringeless Orchid is widespread in TN but mainly in West TN and the Western Highland Rim. Habitats include moist meadows and prairies, prairie swales, openings in floodplain woodlands, swamps, moist thickets, gravelly seeps, streambanks, poorly drained fallow fields, and ditches. This orchid benefits from disturbance that reduces overhead trees and other kinds of competing vegetation. It is often found in seasonal wetlands that are flooded during the spring, but dry out during the summer.

    Faunal Associations: The nectar of the flowers attracts primarily large butterflies and Sphinx moths.  Various mammalian herbivores (deer, rabbits, cattle, etc.) sometimes browse on the foliage and flowers of this and other orchids. It may be necessary to place wire cages around individual plants or erect fences to prevent the destruction of local orchid populations by these animals.

    Photographic Location: Cumberland Mountain State Park, TN

    Comments: When this orchid is in full bloom, it is very eye-catching and beautiful.The species name peramoena means "very beautiful,"referring to the flowers of this strikingly attractive orchid.

Monday, August 29, 2016

Double Lobelia


Great Blue Lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica)

Photographic Location: Wilson County Tennessee
Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis L.) 

Photographic Location: Wilson County Tennessee



Campanulaceae (Bellflower Family)